Episode 5 - The State of Play Between Men and Women

When 1 woman a week is killed by a current or former partner in Australia and when men’s violence towards other men is even more prevalent again, what is truly going on for men?

Boys are born with a natural tenderness and fragility, so what is being fostered in our society that would render men capable of domestic violence many years later? Why do some women say they like ’tough guys?’ And what happens when a woman feels she can never measure up to the picture she thinks she has to look like?

In this sensitive and considered interview, Serge Benhayon and Rebecca Asquith explore the state of play between men and women and the essence of what a true expression of gender could look like, beyond the manufactured male/female ideals we are conditioned by.

220 comments

  • leigh matson May 22, 2017   Reply →

    These are very rich interviews, so vastly different from anything else I’ve watched where the focus is all about the object, the achievement, the job role etc. Having conversations about our being and how that is (or not) related to in the world today is awesome, Thank you.

    • Rowena Stewart September 3, 2017   Reply →

      I agree Leigh. These interviews deliver a whole new understanding on some very well worn topics. When we begin to look at life via the quality of our being-ness, we are given a whole new portal through which to bring about truly positive changes, changes that begin within us and then naturally radiate out into the world.

  • Jennifer Smith May 22, 2017   Reply →

    What a fabulous discussion. Even though what is talked about is what is going on for men and then for women, what is highlighted is that in truth there is no difference. We are all very naturally tender, adorable, loving etc and we have been conditioned through society to say “well that’s normal for a man or woman”. We are not questioning the status quo, we are not asking is this true. We think because something may be common, we think that this is natural. But ‘common’ just shows us how far off track we are and how far away we have gone from our delicate and tender essence that is within each and every human being.

    • Natallija June 23, 2017   Reply →

      The common is so portrayed as the normal nowadays. The levels of disregard are far greater than we care to imagine of men and women. What is so powerful in this episode is how Serge Benahyon continues to bring the truly without judgement but a moment to ponder on what we truly all are and what we so often ignore and choose to be.

  • Rik Connors May 23, 2017   Reply →

    The state of play of men and women in general and how I used to live is far from the qualities I now live. I am a living example of a tender sensitive man. I once lived as a male ‘living on the edge’. Playing hard on the football field. Surfing big waves and pulling into big barrels placing my body on the line. In the party scene I challenged what it was to ‘party hard’ by partying for 3 days with no sleep. In all of these roles I was aggressive using my size to intimidate others who challenged or contested me. Through healing via Universal Medicine and the reflection of true beauty of Serge Benhayon I realised what my body was truly craving – a relationship of being honest and just how much I craved intimacy and the realness of love and all I felt as a sensitive delicate man. I am so much more surrendered in myself and my body and not falling for acceptance or recognition outside of myself as the roles were of ‘playing hard’ to fit and mold into society. I cannot recommend more just how great it feels to honour what I know and feel from this beauty inside.

    • Mary May 23, 2017   Reply →

      Having just met you Rik, I couldn’t imagine you partying hard for 3 days straight! I was stuck by your warmth and sensitively.
      I have worked all my adult life in a male dominated industry and I have noticed that as young men they want to work hard and play harder, I have watched how many men who come into the workplace with the drive to become successful reach a certain point usually when they become dads for the first time and all that tenderness and sensitivity that they bottle up in order to compete and become successful pours out of them as they nurtures their first child it is quite delightful because at last they are allowing that side of them to be seen and felt by all.

    • Golnaz Shariatzadeh May 26, 2017   Reply →

      Knowing many men like yourself and Serge Benhayon who live with the greatest level of love, care, tenderness and integrity, I do wonder about the depth of hurt and limitation experienced by men because of the cliché characterisation so many find themselves trapped in, which keeps them away from gorgeous expression you are sharing about. And at the end of the day we all lose.
      It is a joy to read about this turn around Rik. A lovely reflection that none of those hard aggressive acts were real.

      • Natallija June 3, 2017   Reply →

        Yes the cliche and ideals that run the images of men today leave not an inch for men to surrender and give themselves the permission to just be. I have often seen young boys on the playground forced to play a particular sport in order to fit in and belong when what is truly seen is a gentle and loving young boy who is not naturally rough and hasn’t got a single speckle of competitiveness in him.

  • Lieke Campbell May 23, 2017   Reply →

    I loved the part about the fact that if women are not flourishing in society it means we have to look at how we made society. Instead what now often is said is that women have to toughen up or change to be able to deal with society – this is a very true comment. I would love to change society to be more supportive of women and men to be who they truly are.

    • Golnaz Shariatzadeh May 26, 2017   Reply →

      This is such a beautiful example of the difference between (a) going into opposition and fighting something, egged on by our hurts and judgments, and in contrast (b) lovingly shedding light on, debasing and healing the foundations which seeded and encouraged the loveless and disharmonious expression in the first place.
      Which one is a quick band-aid for some, and which one offers expansion and evolution for the All? It is kind of a no-brainer.

      • Natallija June 17, 2017   Reply →

        The shedding of light and bringing more understanding is what brings a healing for all rather than the cycle of “I win” attitude that is played out in relationships time and time again.

    • Natallija July 2, 2017   Reply →

      The responsibility lies in looking at the part we have played in allowing this play between men and women to continue and worsen over the decades.

  • Joshua Campbell May 23, 2017   Reply →

    Serge Benhayon, where would we be without you? This is a sensitive topic and one that needs to be talked about for sure, and you hold nothing back even if most would find this confronting. How many marriages out there are true after all if we have such high domestic murder rates from the people we are supposed love and who love us back? Most would not even consider that the very definition of love is clearly no where near its truth and that what we are reacting to about the other person is something that is definitely not love at all.

  • Judith Andras May 23, 2017   Reply →

    “How did we end up with a reality that is actually not the reality of our beingness?”
    A brilliant question to ask. And it is exactly the lack of these kind of questions that lead us into this situation, because we accept the lowering of standards and the more we accept it the more we lose who we truly are and what we really come from.

    • Rowena Stewart July 16, 2017   Reply →

      So true Judith and this is the mastery of Serge Benhayon, that he puts these questions back under our noses and empowers us to remember who we truly are, time and time again.

    • Natallija September 3, 2017   Reply →

      This question is so on the mark of how far we have removed ourselves from what we truly are and what we value over our core being.

  • Susan Wilson May 23, 2017   Reply →

    We give our innate power away because we don’t understand that we are all meant to be fragile and gently caring – which is our strength no matter what the gender. It is that simple, so why don’t we want to see the simplicity?

    • Natallija August 18, 2017   Reply →

      There seems to be no space for fragility and sensitivity in this world as it has become a sign of weakness that tells us that we don’t fit in or the usual “toughen up ” approach. This episode is a great example of how one man allows himself to express his truth, in order for us all to know that the same truth resides in all.

  • Nicola Lessing May 23, 2017   Reply →

    I absolutely loved listening to and watching every minute of this conversation. What Serge Benhayon shares makes so much sense that I always feel as if I am hearing my own inner voice speaking and yet at the same time it is absolutely revelatory and deeply healing. Quite a magical combination. Great questions from Rebecca Asquith too!

    • Jonathan Stewart July 12, 2017   Reply →

      Beautifully expressed, Nicola, and know exactly what you mean. What Serge Benhayon says is so familiar yet at the same time it is new.

  • Ariana Ray May 23, 2017   Reply →

    Watching this power packed episode last night prompted me to consider how one form of violence in our communities is the trigger for another, like a pandemic it infects people to react. Taking 50 steps back to feel the sensitivity of every man and woman, we look at that truth and then ask – how can this be? As Rebecca Asquith states- no man is born a brute – but as a society we allow children to be brought up as such. That is the responsibility of us all.

    • Vicky Cooke June 1, 2017   Reply →

      Yep or as Serge expresses take 100 steps back and we get to feel so much more stripping it right back to get to the root of the problem.

      • Viktoria August 6, 2017   Reply →

        To find out that there isn’t actually a problem, but just beauty underneath it all!

  • Ingrid Ward May 23, 2017   Reply →

    Now this is television at its absolute best; informing, inspiring and continually challenging what we as humanity have accepted to be normal, such as “fragility is a weakness”. The belief shattering statement ‘Fragility is not a weakness’, on its own is enough to make everyone sit and take notice of the wisdom that Serge Benhayon shares so very regularly. I am one who sat up and took notice 12 years ago, and haven’t stopped being inspired since.

  • Nikki McKee May 23, 2017   Reply →

    Such huge topics covered and so many bombs dropped, yet all with a sparkle in the eyes – both Serge and Rebecca. When delivered with such sparkle, it’s impossible to get down and out about the state of play between men and women and this was a very strong example of a man and a woman living in their divine-ness.

  • Abby Hinchcliffe May 23, 2017   Reply →

    This brings worlds of understanding not only to the state of play between men and women, and our relationship with the world. When Serge first mentioned taking 100 steps back I felt the depth of absolute honour, understanding and love this man holds people in. We are so fortunate to be graced by these interviews. Thank you Rebecca Asquith, Serge Benhayon, and the production team.

    • Natallija June 4, 2017   Reply →

      Yes Abby, the honour, coated with bucket loads of humility and understanding, allows for this incredible interview to take place. Where a topic of discussion that hits to the truth is brought to the world with such honesty and openness.

    • Viktoria August 6, 2017   Reply →

      Yes, 100% – it is so amazing to have something to watch which brings truth in our lives. We are very blessed to have this group of people who are dedicated to life and love.

  • Gabriele Conrad May 23, 2017   Reply →

    “The reality which we have made our reality” – what we call normal in other words because enough people are doing it: a sorry state of affairs where men and women do not live who they truly are and force themselves and each other into falsities and untruths.

    • Golnaz Shariatzadeh May 24, 2017   Reply →

      In such an environment the questions posed by Serge which invite us to stop and reassess the foundations upon which we are building our lives are pure Gold.

      • Natallija November 19, 2017   Reply →

        So often the foundation is far from this level of quality and shine and we continue to accept less when deep inside we are beyond this and more!

    • Natallija November 10, 2017   Reply →

      Yes and when we start to normalise the abnormal we then need to seriously look at what is being delivered in this episode. A truth marker with an unwavering commitment to exposing our true potential.

  • Golnaz Shariatzadeh May 24, 2017   Reply →

    I love how Serge Benhayon never takes sides or make it about this person or that. He always recognises the absolute love and divinity within each and every person, and looks at the dynamics that lead to the person expressing contrary to that innate essence.

    And how astute his observations are, making more sense than anything I have ever studied or come across. A gorgeous reminder that instead of mistrust and being wary of our fellow brothers and sisters, what we need is to work together and build a society that from day one values, nurtures and honours everyone’s true essence.

  • rosanna bianchini May 24, 2017   Reply →

    “A reality is what has been generated to be a reality” This statement really does bring us to question the type and quality of the reality we’ve created – is it one of our beingness as Serge Benhayon asks? Or, is it a reality generated from nothing more than pictures, ideals, beliefs, habits and tradition? A compelling proposition and question and ones worth exploring and unpicking.

  • Karin Barea May 24, 2017   Reply →

    The questions asked are so poignant as to why we are where we are today with such high levels of violence between and within the genders, and oneself. What happens as boys, who are naturally so tender, grow up? Such a great look at how we are parenting children and how we need to come from a different angle if both genders are to return to their sensitive, loving selves. I know I needed men to be tougher so I could see some semblance of gentleness in myself in comparison. This was such an imposition on the men around me and such a dishonouring of my natural sacredness and delicateness which I now know I can return to.

    • Natallija June 8, 2017   Reply →

      The motto of let boys be boys or how we presume that it is natural for all boys to enjoy rough and tumble play is far from the truth. What is offered here is the innate sensitivity that we all see in little boys and how we are quick as a society to box and demand a certain way of being to belong. Thank you Serge Benhayon for speaking with such love and deep levels of humbleness in this video.

  • Ariana Ray May 24, 2017   Reply →

    ‘Boys are born with a natural tenderness and fragility.’ And in this episode of Serge Benhayon TV the way we have ignored this is exposed, along with the human toll of living with a disconnection to such sensitivity.

    • Natallija June 13, 2017   Reply →

      The human toll of disconnection that you have raised here Ariana Ray is what is so humbly discussed between Serge Benhayon and the presenter. Yes we can all feel that something is amiss in how we are relating to one another but is isn’t till now that we can truly say that we have been offered an opportunity to ponder on the simplicity that brings us all back to a unified truth.

    • James Nicholson July 9, 2017   Reply →

      So very true Ariana and something we can all feel within. A child just tends to forget it as they grow up. We are all deeply sensitive and tender beings – Serge Benhayon helps to expose this fact and has helped re-kindle this in many men worldwide including myself.

      • Natallija August 8, 2017   Reply →

        The tenderness you share here is what is the powerful sharing of this video has for all to hear and feel. That like many there is another way to be and live that is far from what we are currently projecting to the world.

  • Mary May 25, 2017   Reply →

    Thank you Serge Benhayon,for speaking up about the inequality between men and woman. We are so out of balance with each other and it doesn’t have to be this way – as you rightly say we are, both parties, very sensitive and fragile and we can so easily see this in young children. But somehow this seems to get crushed within us and we are left struggling in a society that doesn’t foster kind words and or deeds towards each other. We now seem to live in a dog eat dog society so to say and I find this very sad because we live so far away from the gorgeousness we really are.

  • Christoph Schnelle May 25, 2017   Reply →

    I find it quite strange that to succeed many women choose to express very similarly to men. I understand how that feels very disharmonious – but perhaps any alternative seems difficult to find?

  • Stephen Gammack May 25, 2017   Reply →

    To take the women cage fighting as an example, I would find I would have a bit of a reaction in watching that and want to exclaim it is wrong, and yet here is Serge, and his sharing is that its not his flavour, but no reaction or condemnation, just an understanding that is where many people are at, in terms of what we seek. That is a very loving way to be, and perhaps that way is the answer we seek, as I write this in the week of condemnation over the Manchester terror attack, we won’t change anything with anger, we have to find another way.

    • Natallija June 5, 2017   Reply →

      Yes the willingness of Serge Benhayon to be open, not judgemental and non – reactive is the key to a more humble and understanding approach to all topics that lead us to wonder what is truly going on for humanity if we are now seeing a sport that far from celebrates the two players in their own right.

    • Rowena Stewart July 30, 2017   Reply →

      What Serge Benhayon’s offers us here is a vital lesson to learn so I really appreciate you highlighting this point Stephen. When we choose to return to our innate tenderness, our desire for things like this pale into insignificance, both in the watching and performing of such things. These acts exist because of our demand for them, but when we begin to cherish, honour and express our inner tenderness and wisdom, what we demand from the outer world undergoes a huge and ever evolving revolution. There is no need to protest or ban something, if we focus instead on nurturing our innate qualities no one is interested in consuming such commodities and they just die a natural death.

  • Peta Lehane May 25, 2017   Reply →

    The extraordinary thing is the reality we find ourselves in is so far removed from the truth of who we are….the examples and statistics given make my jaw drop and it is amazing how this false reality is continually generated to the point where so many have given up on true equality between the genders, where both are free to express from their tender, delicate selves and be completely open with one another. So very many veils obscure the truth of who we are yet these steps we need to take us back as presented in this interview, are part of the turn around humanity desperately needs to return to itself. The best TV ever. Awesome.

  • Kerstin Salzer May 25, 2017   Reply →

    This discussion about men and women in our society is turning us and our world upside down in expressing and showing who we truly are. It is giving deep respect towards the true expression of men and women, which most of us are not used to as it has been almost lost.

  • Stephen Gammack May 26, 2017   Reply →

    A conversation on men and women with no blame and no bashing of either gender. The more we understand the human condition we have created the less we feel the need to take sides. Instead we can start to understand and accept more. I thought the revelation on why women go searching for macho men was so beautifully simplistic and revealing. It makes sense that when we look for something to hide up what we don’t want to feel, and such reasoning can apply to every relationship we have, how much do we want another to reflect to us?

    • Natallija June 2, 2017   Reply →

      Yes Stephen Gammack I found this revelation very valuable as I often couldn’t understand why friends had chosen certain partners yet now from watching this episode I am more aware of the partners that I chose as well. A very revealing and humbling lesson.

    • Rowena Stewart July 13, 2017   Reply →

      Very true Stephen, I agree. A) It is a relief to hear someone present on the relationship between genders without beating a drum about either one, and B) What an awesome awareness to bring our attention to, the fact that we seek a greater level of toughness in a relationship in order to make our own level of toughness seem gentle! It all brings us back to realizing that underneath the armour we, men and women, have created for our selves, is an exquisitely tender essence yearning to be expressed.

  • Alison Moir May 26, 2017   Reply →

    We are not born hard and driven so taking 100 steps back make sense to see how far removed we are from the loving tender gentle men and women we naturally are and born to be.

  • HM May 26, 2017   Reply →

    Love this interview and the statement expressed here about the fact that men have not even reached the point by which they can openly express that the toughness is not truly them. Wow – how far away have we come from supporting and nurturing the tenderness we naturally are. It also shows the responsibility we have as parents and adults to reflect to kids that they can be who they are.

  • rosanna bianchini May 27, 2017   Reply →

    Serge Benhayon has the most amazing ability to take those hundred steps back to be able to observe and discern what the truth is, underlying any behaviour. In that understanding there is huge space for the situation or behaviour to be turned around.

  • Stephen Gammack May 27, 2017   Reply →

    Has there ever been a time in history where we have allowed boys and men to express tenderness fully. Perhaps a long time ago, but considering the travails of our current times wouldn’t it be an incredible experiment to allow tenderness and gentleness to flourish, make that a worldwide campaign, marketing and giving men permission to be themselves. “Boys will be boys” indeed.

  • Kerstin Salzer May 27, 2017   Reply →

    It is so beautiful to hear and deeply resonates in my heart what we as woman and equaly as human beings are in truth. This I never heard in any other interview and discussion about women or men.

    • Natallija November 5, 2017   Reply →

      And this is just the start of such powerful discussions we are offered to extend and support us in the world of sensational media and device watching.

  • Ariana Ray May 27, 2017   Reply →

    Being presented with these statistics is shocking and it needs to be, for what is described here is not acceptable. We cannot find this a good way to live – how could it be? The damage that is done is incomprehensible.

    • Marianna June 2, 2017   Reply →

      Indeed, and to think that the issues of domestic violence etc are the result of the dramatic deviation away from our true nature. It is this deviation away from our true nature of love, harmony and tenderness that I find incomprehensible.

  • Gill Randall May 27, 2017   Reply →

    I can feel the truth that Serge Benhayon describes about the push and drive of the male energy in society that men and women live. It is not our truth to be aggressive and ruthless but it is “The reality we have made real” in society. When we understand this, we can look at how we have chosen to behave less than the love that we are.

  • Stephanie Stevenson May 27, 2017   Reply →

    What we accept as ‘normal’ in life now is far from living from the innate Divine Essence and naturally tender being that we are that we all are. A great exposure of what is truly going on to examine how these behaviours exist.

  • HM May 27, 2017   Reply →

    This poses the question – what have we allowed? A huge interview that certainly asks me to look at, even as a woman – how do I see a man? For his absolute tenderness first no matter what? It calls for responsibility in all aspects of human life – from the parents to the friends to the partners.

  • Sarah Karam May 27, 2017   Reply →

    This has to be my favourite episode so far. The gender issue is so interesting, the points Serge Benhayon make in this video are so normal and make so much sense that when I am watching, the main thing that crosses my mind is wondering why I didn’t say this stuff already or why more people aren’t bringing this to the table? The stand out line for me was “What if our reality is simply a version of reality but not “the” reality?”
    I have to agree, what are we basing our current state of affairs on? Well perhaps we are trying to solve the problem without taking 100 steps back? Great feeling, to watch TV and feel like you didn’t waste any time.

    • Golnaz Shariatzadeh May 30, 2017   Reply →

      I love the sobering and empowering insights offered through such a conversation. It is so easy to despair at what we see in the world and either give up or knee jerk into trying to force a solution without having a full understanding of just what it is that requires attention. Just these two concepts alone, of realizing that what we hold ‘real’ is a reality we have created which inherently means we have full power to change it, and the need to take 100 steps back in order be able to understand the dynamics at play instead of being a puppet of our reactions, just these alone are huge.

  • Elizabeth McCann May 28, 2017   Reply →

    This is a very important conversation to have access to as it, outlines very plainly how so many of us in society have fallen for the false belief that if something is common in our world, then it is considered normal. This is very much the case with how men and women view and behave with and towards each other. It’s time to let go of the pictures, beliefs and misunderstandings we hold about the roles and qualities of the genders and see how we are all, at our core, naturally delicate, tender, caring and fragile and live our lives accordingly, and in harmony with each other.

  • rosanna bianchini May 28, 2017   Reply →

    Serge Benhayon’s understanding of man and his psychology is deeply touching to witness here, – such delicacy in the way he is able to bring men back to know who they are so that they can begin to be all of who they are.

  • Kerstin Salzer May 28, 2017   Reply →

    This is a conversation I certainly will listen to on a regular basis as it contains so much wisdom presented with love and delicacy concerning women and men.

  • Andrew Mooney May 28, 2017   Reply →

    The simplicity and depth offered here to the conundrum of the ‘battle of the sexes’ which has plagued humanity for a long time is truly profound. Well worth listening to.

  • HM May 28, 2017   Reply →

    Very exposing here how women can go for ‘tough’ men to look tender in comparison. I was hard as nails and very driven and certainly wanted the mucho man. So hearing this really brought home my reasoning behind that and it is only in the last few years, after connecting to and appreciating who I am as a woman, that I have let go of the investment in tough men.

  • Stephen Gammack May 29, 2017   Reply →

    If we accept that to relate and connect with other people is a good thing then we surely must also embrace our sensitive nature. Because as explained here the two go hand in hand, our ability to be open and share how we are feeling relates strongly to our sensitivity. If this is an innate quality, which I believe it is, then we should stop using phrases such as “he’s too sensitive” and instead see the strength in this word.

  • Shami May 29, 2017   Reply →

    To take 100 steps back where we would arrive at the start of a person’s journey, where they are a tender child who would never hurt or cause harm. this is the door to understanding ourselves as a one humanity and this is where true understanding comes from.

  • Elizabeth Dolan May 29, 2017   Reply →

    I enjoyed this interview hugely. Rebecca Asquith is a great interviewer and it is obvious the equality between her and Serge Benhayon. The state of play between men and women is something that a lot of people are interested in and it was wonderful to have it discussed without the usual blaming and shaming that goes on when gender is the topic. Serge Benhayon clearly sees beyond the norm and I just loved his suggestion that if we are to really understand what is going on for men that we have to take 100 steps back to find the answer. This to me is brilliant because it ensures that we are not trying to find answers from a reaction to the current state of play.

  • Natalie Hawthorne May 29, 2017   Reply →

    This is awesome to listen to, watch and feel. Feeling the truth of what Serge Benhayon is presenting and the depths of what he is saying totally exposes where we are today and our state of play. The reality that we have created which is so far from our natural expression of men and women.

  • Vicky Cooke May 29, 2017   Reply →

    Another incredibly awesome and much needed interview with Serge Benhayon and Rebecca Asquith. I love the analogy of the cut on the thumb to expose just how sensitive we actually are I have so experience that even with the smallest paper cut in how much it hurts and how my whole body is aware of this one tiny paper cut. ‘The fact is It is not our truth to be ruthless’ ‘It is not our truth to be aggressive’ – “hear hear!”. So much to discuss here. Thank you.

  • Golnaz Shariatzadeh May 29, 2017   Reply →

    We can see how children of both sexes are immensely tender, delicate, sensitive and incapable of aggression in that. So this is our true nature – whatever age we are, but often it is not our reality.
    I love the simplicity of what Serge Benhayon proposes: if that is not our reality, then it is for us “to question the reality we have made real. as opposed to a different reality that is available to us.”

  • Stephanie Stevenson May 30, 2017   Reply →

    As always, Serge Benhayon exposes lies and delivers truth with an absolute clarity, that leaves no doubt as to what is actually true.
    Women think they love tough men and to be treated that way, but it is a way of avoiding feeling the tenderness, delicateness and fragility within.

    • Stephen Gammack June 1, 2017   Reply →

      Yes Stephanie, I loved that part too, it is true that men want to feel safe to be gentle and tender, certainly for me anyway. I always felt a bit confused when I heard women saying they wanted a tough guy, as I knew that wasn’t me. Nowadays I feel very sure in myself that there is nothing to be gained by being hard and tough and that being gentle and fragile is a great thing to be.

  • Natalie Hawthorne May 30, 2017   Reply →

    When we stop and listen to what Serge is presenting here that it is actually impossible for any gender to harm yet it has become our reality to do this makes you see it with different eyes and understanding. We have strayed so far from our natural essence to be doing something towards another that is actually harm and hurting them and ourselves. I say lets start stripping back right to the beginning so we feel supported to address what is not true in our lives. It doesn’t need to be violence as the extreme either we can start to look at our own lives and see if there is any level of abuse that we accepted as our reality.

  • Gill Randall May 30, 2017   Reply →

    The way Serge Benhayon describes stepping one hundred steps back, it brings us back to the fact that no-one starts out life as abusive. Toughness is not our natural state, it is how we have learned to behave. There are so many gems of truth to learn in these great Serge Benhayon TV episodes.

  • Leigh Strack May 30, 2017   Reply →

    When you begin watching a TV program, mostly you get a feel for how the episode will unravel and there are very few true surprises. Watching Serge Benhayon TV is full of wisdom, all interconnected to the core subject but expanded to include way more than one may have been willing to consider. This episode is full of surprises, yet is no surprise as to how we have come the the point we are currently at that violence is such a horribly ‘normal’ part of our society. Lets all take a moment to stop and really hear what it is that Serge is sharing with us and maybe our next generation will be given the freedom to grow and hold on the the natural tender essence we are all born with.

  • HM May 31, 2017   Reply →

    As Serge Benhayon and Rebecca Asqith have shared, men are naturally tender. I am blessed to know a handful of such men who are this in full, Serge being one of them. It has opened my eyes to the fact that a tough man is just a man who has allowed society to tell him who he should be. When a man is prepared to drop this, there is no stopping the realness and tenderness that is underneath.

    • Christoph Schnelle June 3, 2017   Reply →

      Yes, a tough man – does he have the backbone to be himself?

  • Danna Elmalah May 31, 2017   Reply →

    A huge bomb just landed – when I heard the full episode number 5.. Jaw dropping, showing us all the steps we have turned away from what both our genders are in truth representing.. And the falsity we have fallen for. And hence we are now in the result of and need, as Serge explained,to go all the way back to where the problem started, meaning we indeed need to take 100 steps or more back to eventually truly resolve it. Yet we need to be very understanding that our both men and women have not lived the truth of who we are – and so being very tender on our return to dissolving all the lies we have allowed to be our reality – which is not our own, original truth. Thank you Serge Benhayon and Rebecca Asquith – this is huge news – an invitation to come back to who we truly are. And no longer allow society to be run by lies.

  • Shami June 1, 2017   Reply →

    This interview is Epic in every sense of the word. My most favourite part is the smile at the end, when Serge Benhayon knows the magnitude of what he has just delivered.

  • Kathleen Baldwin June 1, 2017   Reply →

    In this interview Serge Benhayon brings to light the wholeness of our being by qualifying the characteristics that both sexes have in common in our essence so we can all know ourselves from here first and then express the uniqueness of our particular sex in all the beauty and flavor that our gender has to offer. . . . now this is an equality that can never be argued with because we are all the same in essence.

  • Natallija June 1, 2017   Reply →

    I have watched this episode a number of times and I am so touched by the topic and what this offers us all when we look at how far we are heading in the opposite direction of the natural qualities we are able to live as men and women.

  • Stephanie Stevenson June 1, 2017   Reply →

    Wow – an invitation on TV to return to the absolute truth of who we are rather than be bound by a seemingly real way of living, that is in fact an energetically manipulated illusion.

  • Natalie Hawthorne June 2, 2017   Reply →

    When we get honest and admit that there is a lack of beingness in the way we are living and how this has created an existence where by we accept abuse either from ourselves and or others as our normal, it is no wonder we are where we are because of the denial and dismissal of how precious and tender we truly are. Everything is set up for us to not be this at all, but to be tough and shut down.

  • Ariana Ray June 2, 2017   Reply →

    In these interviews Serge Benhayon is taking on the pillars of modern society, he’s exposed our ignorance of our bodies and our heath, the media and its errant lies, and the truth of relationships, here he exposes the shocking truth that we accept domestic violence as normal, that bullying and imposition is normal, that our relationships often end in death of one partner, that we are living so far from love we have lost sight of what love is. It is time to remember.

  • Stephen Gammack June 2, 2017   Reply →

    I must admit I still feel the pressure to act with a level of hardness as a man in society. It is confusing to want to express tenderly, and yet have reaction to this and to feel lesser from being fragile and tender. I have been uncomfortable and not accepting enough of my own sensitivity. Serge Benhayon presentations have been pivotal in developing my understanding that it is ok to be a man who is not naturally rough.

  • Marianna June 2, 2017   Reply →

    This interview is a tremendously in-depth discussion of the state of the world

  • Michelle McWaters June 3, 2017   Reply →

    I love what is being discussed here. Of course it makes sense that if a child is rejected for being who they are or are told to “man up” they will shut down their sensitivity. It is no wonder that men and women struggle to relate to each other when we struggle to relate to ourselves first!

    • Aimee Edmonds June 20, 2017   Reply →

      Well said Michelle, I was having a story relayed to me this afternoon about a boy picking on the girls in class, and it was very one sided about the boy being nasty, and yes the behaviour is not acceptable, however, as they kept talking I said ‘what is going on for the boy?’ and that is when some truth started to be shared. It does not serve us to only look superficially at situations and judge from there, that is where so many of us are misunderstood and not seen for who we truly are.

  • Stephen Gammack June 3, 2017   Reply →

    I find the questions from Rebecca Baldwin deeply insightful. It is rare these days to find such depth in an interviewer, and I can feel how much this allows for the conversation to flow into so many angles of reflection about men and women in society. Because if we stop we can see that there is much to reflect on about how men and women’s roles have become confused and what is shared is that what we accept as normal, like men and now women cage fighting, is not our natural state, and from this perhaps lies the reason for our growing rates of ill health, the choice to not live what is truly supportive for our bodies.

  • Christoph Schnelle June 3, 2017   Reply →

    I wonder how much it cripples us when we permanently are living a way that is not us – how much energy does it take, how much does it affect our life? Actors find being in a role hard work, perhaps it is for men as well.

    • Golnaz Shariatzadeh June 7, 2017   Reply →

      I have noticed the change in the body of young boys when they start playing such roles. It is especially obvious from behind when I witness their tender backs as they walk. With the younger boys there is a beautiful flow and openness, as if their whole body is alive with a gorgeous playful pulse and their shoulders is in a delicate dance. This is such a delight to witness. Then at some stage there seems to be a hardening, as if they are holding their breath. Their little shoulders seem to stiffen in movement and the pulse in their body is not as playful. The difference is remarkable.

  • Vicky Cooke June 3, 2017   Reply →

    Woah … domestic violence is in many cases the only way someone may feel they can express themselves!!! A far cry from the tender young boy or girl they were. Not only does this show the importance of taking it back 100 steps so we get to see and feel the much bigger picture to understand someone but it also really highlights the importance of expression and being able to express ourselves in a way that is true where we are met and heard so this does not get bastardised and turn into the violence in which on many occasions it has done.

  • Melinda Knights June 3, 2017   Reply →

    Wow, I could not at times tell who was the interviewer and the interviewee because both brought such incredible things to say and there was an obvious equality there. There were no roles. That is highly unusual but very welcome in itself. The content was amazing to listen to, yet it was also very common sense, what’s shared here is achievable in terms of societies making changes to how we treat each other and the kind of world we therefore foster. Serge Benhayon is a true philosopher and very needed globally.

  • Golnaz Shariatzadeh June 4, 2017   Reply →

    We generate our reality, we are the ones that say what is normal, so what we are seeing is a reality we have made real. This is such a significant insight shared by Serge Benhayon and a profound invitation to ask how come “we have a society that is not based on the truth of a human being? and where did we go astray that we ended up with such a reality?”

    • HM June 7, 2017   Reply →

      Well said – we certainly do generate our own reality. The fact is there will come a time when we can’t ignore the state of the world anymore. we either contribute to it or we heal it. Those are the choices and this episode starts to ask some relevant and big questions to society.

  • Natalie Hawthorne June 4, 2017   Reply →

    The functioning that Serge talks about is literally everywhere. We have chosen to confirm to a way of existing that means we do what best we know in any situation and function through life. In this function we start to feel like it is ground hog day, same thing over and over even if it might be slightly different. We all know deep down that this is not our true emanation of who we can be. Cutting a cycle that is like a broken record to explore and connect to our inner most quality within is where we can only truly find the Joy that each day holds, no matter where you are and what you are doing.

  • Ariana Ray June 5, 2017   Reply →

    ‘The state of play between men and women’ exposed here is not a pretty picture but it is one we have allowed to occur. We have to take responsibility for the world we live in for our silence allowed these things to happen and continue daily.

    • Jennifer Smith June 9, 2017   Reply →

      Arianna, what you have said here is very true. What we see here we have allowed and its not about blaming its about taking responsibility and saying that I want to live another way. Unfortunately though until something extreme happens such as an illness, it is a rare thing for us to stop and consider that there is in fact another way, a way which is so so natural.

  • Ariana Ray June 6, 2017   Reply →

    Men and women are so much more than the games we engage in. And here we have exposed the price we pay for these games. Brutality towards each other. Even the little ‘picking on you’ behaviours that we justify as ‘right’ over ‘wrong’, are the same energy as the brutality that kills, smashes and destroys people.

  • Natalie Hawthorne June 8, 2017   Reply →

    Life style choices that are reflected in the body can never lie, it is about being open and honest to see what you have been choosing to get you where you are today and see where you can make new choices that will not foster dis-harmony in the body.

  • Shami June 8, 2017   Reply →

    Isn’t it interesting how we can live our whole lives, trying to find solutions to everything we can see and feel is out of kilter with what we all innately know is true, only to find that the answers genuinely do live in ourselves and the in the ability to take 100 steps back through all of our choices and as a global race of people to find what was there at the start, and to find that none of those ill behaviours are really who we are at all.

  • rosanna bianchini June 8, 2017   Reply →

    Beautiful answers here of what the true expression of gender could look like, everything stripped away to reveal the truth of our natural essence.

  • Jennifer Smith June 9, 2017   Reply →

    l love how in this interview there is not an ounce of criticism at all, but certainly a questioning. A questioning asking us how far away are we from the essence of who we are; the essence which is very naturally there when we are small children. What happens as we grow into adulthood and loose touch with that very beautiful innocent and exquisite nature. I saw a video of 2 small children today, one had hurt their knee. They walked up to the other child, who was a boy, and put their leg out. The little boy put down his broom, knelt down and very meticulously and gently kissed the knee of the little girl. Once that was done the little girl went on her way. We look at and share these videos, because we love them and the sweetness that is offered by children in these situations, but do we stop and say…”wow that was me when I was a child, What’s happened? Where have I gone?

  • Jenny James June 10, 2017   Reply →

    Awesome TV Serge with Serge Benhayon and Rebecca Asquith! Until we truly realise and appreciate how precious and tender we all absolutely are, we will always be at odds with ourselves and each other.

  • Natalie Hawthorne June 10, 2017   Reply →

    When we look at the female statistics of illness and disease we can’t deny how very far we are away from being who we naturally are. If we look back generations ago there was a much more simple life being lived. Today as Woman we are expected to be able to do absolutely everything, pretty much all at once, how can this possibly be harmonious to the natural divine beings that we are. I know I have adopted a way of living in the past that was all about the doing and still to this day I catch it coming in. Since meeting Serge Benhayon and studying Esoteric Women’s Health I have totally changed the way I am with myself and the way I am in the world. A way of being that is changing day by day and becoming deeper by the minute.

  • Ariana Ray June 11, 2017   Reply →

    What is presented here is that we have a ‘normality’ that is lived in the world that says men are hard and women are weak, in reaction, women get harder than men and men deny their sensitivity and delicateness. We all become the opposite of who we are. What kind of world do we accept that makes living this way an alright way, when all along love is within us all.

  • Shami June 12, 2017   Reply →

    The statistics that Rebecca Asquith gives us at the beginning of this interview are extremely confronting and for me they bring up a lot of sadness. I can understand why Rebecca brought this current situation in to the interview with Serge Benhayon and I am so grateful for his responses because, as always, he brings not a solution to the predicament but an greater understanding of why we are where we are in the first place, which empowers every person to begin to make changes, in their own time.

  • Vicky Cooke June 12, 2017   Reply →

    ‘violence is impossible for any gender, yet we have violence’. Definitely something to ponder on. We have violence yet it is impossible for us. So how far away have we walked from the truth of who we are, from the truth of our natural gentleness and tenderness? Also ‘What is the woman’s body showing us in the current way we are in society .. women are not flourishing.’ So much is said here in this interview for us to discuss.

  • HM June 12, 2017   Reply →

    The tougher and more hard women feel they need to be to get through life, dictates the toughness and hardness men call in to be ‘a strong man’ – so we have to look at what we are choosing as a society for this to be happening right underneath our noses.

  • Ariana Ray June 13, 2017   Reply →

    The state of being between men and women is in a sorry state today, yet here is Serge Benhayon posing a whole new way of being and he does so because he lives it and has lived it for many years.

    • Golnaz Shariatzadeh June 21, 2017   Reply →

      The honouring with which Serge Benhayon relates to men and women equally and the reflection he offers that we are all so much more loving, precious and divine in our essence than we have been living is truly exquisite.

  • Kerstin Salzer June 14, 2017   Reply →

    To have Serge Benhayon here, who is living what he is talking is giving a deep reflection what everybody is able to live, the vivacessness, love and joy is not only for some, but for everybody. Men and women are mostly captured in their roles like in an empty prison. Serge Benhayon is free in his expression of love and he leads the way where everybody can go if we choose it.

  • Ariana Ray June 16, 2017   Reply →

    The truth is given in full in presentations from Serge Benhayon, because he lives truth each and every day.

  • Shami June 16, 2017   Reply →

    In this interview it is very apparent that there is no condemnation of men or women. There is no mightily cast judgement. There is even no comparison. There is simply the stating of the facts as they are and a willingness to go to the depths of why things are the way they are so that we can begin to make the necessary changes. This to me is a great part of true philosophy – a seeing of the whole and applying that whole to daily life so there may be evolution as a one humanity.

  • Samantha June 18, 2017   Reply →

    Wow I love what Serge Benhayon exposes here, naturally we are all super tender and sensitive, we have just not been given the tools to deal with it – and most do what they can to hide this.
    Love love these episodes.

  • Victoria Lister June 19, 2017   Reply →

    There’s no doubt about it – there is in truth very little that is different between men and women. What we have accepted and normalised as our so-called ‘differences’ – the reality that is not the reality – however sets us apart enormously. Thank God there is Serge Benhayon, a man who knows the reality we should be living, to show us the true way forward.

  • Aimee Edmonds June 20, 2017   Reply →

    We are so much more than the stereotypical slander that is imposed upon females and males everyday. Thank you Serge Benhayon for bringing truth to our natural state of being with each other, and how far we have walked away from that. Because of you, I now bring more understanding to relationships and also what others are telling me that is very much one sided. There is always more to look at and deeper to feel in situations between people then what they are outwardly expressing.

  • SCE June 21, 2017   Reply →

    Serge Benhayon – redefining standards – Any kind of abuse is a million miles from who we are.

    • Natallija June 29, 2017   Reply →

      Yes and the willingness to let this ride is the marker of the quality we are willing to live.

    • Fiona Cochran July 17, 2017   Reply →

      Yes, yet another example of Serge Benhayon ‘redefining standards’ and exposing what is not true. There is so much that we have accepted as normal which is so far away from the truth of who we are.

  • Ariana Ray June 23, 2017   Reply →

    ‘What happens when a woman feels she can never measure up to the picture she thinks she has to look like?’ for that is what is presented to us again and again, how do we step away from such measuring? To develop a tender, loving relationship with ourselves which deepens daily, this is the foundation we stand on.

    • HM June 30, 2017   Reply →

      Ariana – pictures are what hold us back from being who we are in full. Even starting to acknowledge we have a picture starts to break this cycle of ‘never enough’. And as you say here – starts to give us a foundation of what is real.

  • Katerina Nikolaidis June 24, 2017   Reply →

    Watching this video was like being bathed with the most delicate precious essence rekindling my own essence in the process – to celebrate our delicateness, to celebrate our fragility and honour it always, and not acknowledge that the reality we have ‘generated’ as Serge Benhayon brilliantly points out is ‘not the reality of our beingness.’ Wow – let us fully feel that, accept it and turn our lives around and in the entire world in the process.

  • Kerstin Salzer June 25, 2017   Reply →

    I can only say Thank you. Thank you for this interview and raising this topic concerning men and women where most of us have given up on ourselves and stay trapped in hardness.

  • Golnaz Shariatzadeh June 25, 2017   Reply →

    How refreshing to have a conversation which unravels the issues between men and women without taking sides or blame and with such a deep level of love and honouring for everyone.

    As well as profoundly informative, this is a great example for the way to approach any relationship issues: in a manner that calls out what needs attention whilst seeing the highest in both parties and honouring them as such.

  • HM June 26, 2017   Reply →

    I love what is shared here about being delicate and sensitive and how we are all naturally this. And in truth we all know we don’t like pain and yet we cause it to each other all of the time.

  • Carmel Reid June 27, 2017   Reply →

    This is such a simple explanation that helps us to understand what is truly going on in the world

  • jennym June 28, 2017   Reply →

    What I love about these interviews is that no matter the topic the understanding behind any topical issue lies 100 steps back where we separated from who we truly are. It means that we can avoid complicating things and if we choose deal with things at their root cause not at the symptom level.

  • Kerstin Salzer June 28, 2017   Reply →

    It is beautiful to hear and repeat hearing what we naturally are, as our picture of ourselves is often not meeting this joy, we naturally are.

  • Ariana Ray June 28, 2017   Reply →

    Having been one of the ‘tough’, ‘hard’ and ‘driven’ women, who used to be more like a man than a man when ever they were around, I can totally relate to this description by Serge Benhayon, and the outcome of it on the woman’s body. Letting that toughness go and showing the delicacy I am is part of this delight-full exploration of being a woman.

  • John O Connell June 29, 2017   Reply →

    Thank you Rebecca a beautiful interview. I have always wondered how we as male and female got to a place of hating and disliking each other . For when one holds a new born baby male or female that is not what you get.

  • Natalie Hawthorne July 1, 2017   Reply →

    I remember being 12 years of age and playing rugby with the boys at lunch time and trying to be as tough as them, such an extraordinary force of masculine energy and being really hard, even sometimes aggressive in a subtle way. This hardness was encouraged as we grew up and I totally lost sight of my sweet, tender and delicate nature. Thank goodness for Serge Benhayon and the modalities of Universal Medicine I have been able to heal and let go of what was causing such a destructive being that I was pretending to be.

    • Golnaz Shariatzadeh July 8, 2017   Reply →

      When I see the tenderness in young boys and in those men who like Serge Benhayon choose to live the true power and grace of their essence, I realise that the hardened and aggressive nature so frequently attributed to men is not honouring of even the men. The fact that women have also been adopting the same in a bid for ‘equality’, shows how lost we all have been as a society.

  • Adele Leung July 3, 2017   Reply →

    No matter how the reality of men and women are today, to redefine what the truth is of genders, we are to live what we know is true for us within our hearts. To let go of all the pictures of what defines a man as well as of a woman, and simply live this truth with ourselves and with others.

  • John O Connell July 4, 2017   Reply →

    Its lovely when Serge Benhayon explains ” sensitivity allows us to communicate and relate at a level that we have until now not experienced as a community ” is it not amazing and tragic ,we have gotten ourselves into the mess the world is in between men and women where we kill each other due to the fact that we have abandoned our sensitivity so as to not feel the truth and be sensitive to whats truly going on .

  • Ariana Ray July 4, 2017   Reply →

    If we were to be super-honest we would all acknowledge how devastating it is to feel the dire state of play between men and women today, we would be able to feel that down to our bones we are living less. We are accepting a game where we are the pawns.

    • Fiona Cochran July 17, 2017   Reply →

      ‘We are accepting a game where we are the pawns’ yes and it’s a game which is getting more serious and extreme by the day as more and more people seem to accept living with hardness and abuse.

  • Caroline Francis July 5, 2017   Reply →

    For a man to know who he is in a world that is set up against knowing who he is I have to question my or our responsibility as women in this. When a man is not being himself what have I allowed into my life? By allowing a man space and truly loving him from a place of love for oneself opens the door offering the true qualities to be let out and expressed.

  • Ariana Ray July 8, 2017   Reply →

    Imagine for a moment that we had no protection or defence between men and women – that would be a true way to live. Letting go of all that hardness, manipulation and control between each other and allowing honesty to be with us both. Lets bring it on now.

  • Rowena Stewart July 12, 2017   Reply →

    Love the ‘bombshell’ at the end. We are so entrenched in the reality we have created and I really appreciate Serge Benhayon’s ability to take a huge step backwards in order to observe the whole issue not just a thin section of it. We are all so innately tender and sweet what, on Earth, are we subscribing to that has resulted in such awful violence against one another when our true natures are in fact the complete opposite.

  • Jonathan Stewart July 12, 2017   Reply →

    The co-dependence between men and women to protect us from our fragility based on a false interpretation of the meaning of fragile, exposed by Serge Benhayon in this conversation, is a paradigm shift no less significant than discovering that the world is not flat but round. To adopt and live from the understanding presented here changes the whole dynamics of relationships not only between men and women but in every relationship no matter what gender, age or nationality.

  • Jonathan Stewart July 12, 2017   Reply →

    The journey to return to our tenderness as shared by Serge Benhayon and explained here without judgment as to why to do so is so challenging, makes so much sense that it feels so much more achievable.

  • John O Connell July 13, 2017   Reply →

    Thank you Rebecca Asquith, I love Serge Benhayon’s simple story about how if a person cuts their finger while preparing food, a situation just about everyone can identity with, is simple evidence that shows how sensitive and fragile we as human really are – male or female.

  • Jonathan Stewart July 13, 2017   Reply →

    The proposal by Serge Benhayon that for true healing to occur requires taking ‘a hundred steps back’ rather than finding a solution to the symptom/situation really does present the way forward to address and resolve the present worldwide crisis in illness, disease, mental health and social dis-order and by doing so will establish brotherhood on Earth.

  • Kerstin Salzer July 14, 2017   Reply →

    When Serge Benhayon is talking about the state of a baby and its natural tenderness it is deeply to ponder why we ended up as a race of humans with so much cruelty going on.

  • Natalie Hawthorne July 15, 2017   Reply →

    Is it not fascinating that what we have created to be our normal is very very far away if not the opposite to who we naturally are designed to be. Our choices to what energy we allow in and through us is one of responsibility that we can’t really ignore for to much longer. If we do our bodies are going to be letting us know loud and clear.

  • Jonathan Stewart July 16, 2017   Reply →

    Exposing the falseness of some women’s desire for a ‘tough’ man as a cover, a protection of the fear of their fragility lays bare the truth of the true nature of women and their glory that is suppressed by society.

  • Jonathan Stewart July 16, 2017   Reply →

    Exposing that the gain of women’s equality is not true equality because it has been won through the use of male energy and at the expense of their health rather than through the honouring and acceptance of their true nature is a hugely significant revelation and accounts for so much of the present disharmony within the sexes.

  • Ariana Ray July 16, 2017   Reply →

    To step away from what is normal in society and live differently to what is offered as normal, it takes a great deal of self love and a determination not to fall in with what is truly abusive, even though it is a ‘norm’ in society.

  • Fiona Cochran July 17, 2017   Reply →

    What has become our normal is so far away from our natural way of being and we have come to accept this as our reality rather than question what is actually going on.

  • Fiona Cochran July 17, 2017   Reply →

    The statistic that 1 women a week is killed by a current or former partner is so shocking and yet these figures are not widely discussed, in the sense that there is something seriously wrong with the way we are living and what is going on for us if this is the case. We need to start being honest about what we have accepted as ‘normal’ as it is so far from normal and the truth of who we are.

  • Kerstin Salzer July 19, 2017   Reply →

    When women and men allow more of their tenderness and fragility in their lifes relationships between men and women will look different.

  • Ariana Ray July 20, 2017   Reply →

    ‘ What happens when a woman feels she can never measure up to the picture she thinks she has to look like?’ What an indictment on women to consider that we have gone so far from who we really are that we fall for a picture being who we are instead of connecting to the vast love that is inside us. And we all have fallen for this, yet the choice is there to look again at what is truth.

  • Natalie Hawthorne July 26, 2017   Reply →

    Amazing interview with Serge Benhayon and Rebecca Asquith – an incredible job. Having this recorded so we can go back to every time we want to is absolute Gold. The biggest thank you to you both for such amazing truth. Life changing stuff!

  • Rowena Stewart July 26, 2017   Reply →

    It is so refreshing that this conversation goes nowhere near the usual norms that this topic usually engenders. When we consider life and our relationships between genders from the point of our ‘Being-ness’ and innate tenderness, we are empowered to see that the way to develop a truly honouring relationship is not through ‘fighting for our rights’ but in bringing to the fore what has been to date a very protected but immensely powerful quality within us. When we truly recognise one another’s tenderness, these relationships naturally resume their natural respectful expression.

    • Golnaz Shariatzadeh August 10, 2017   Reply →

      It is a profound realisation that it is never about fighting, discord or demands. If we look through our history this has never brought a harmony, unity and honouring of one another, in fact it has always fueled further separation, animousity and abusive dynamics. “When we truly recognise one another’s tenderness, these relationships naturally resume their natural respectful expression”. A great truth to remember in every relationship.

  • Ariana Ray July 26, 2017   Reply →

    While the topic is the state of play between men and women, you may as well say it is equally about being love and not being love – and powerfully presented.

  • Gill Randall July 27, 2017   Reply →

    I love the deeper learning that can come with these TV episodes. For example, when Serge Benhayon suggests that we take 100 steps back to get a greater understanding of what is going on between men and women, this makes such sense. The tenderness of little boys is all naturally there, we as parents can stifle the development of this in our boys because of the hardness in us. But the essence remains in us all and never leaves us. The understanding of our fragility as a beauty within both genders brings us back to delicateness and tenderness for everyone.

  • Rowena Stewart July 29, 2017   Reply →

    These interviews are worth watching several times over, as each time another piece of wisdom comes to the fore. Re-uniting both genders with our exquisite tenderness brings us back to a true foundation of relationship, firstly within our selves and then with each other. Never before has the issue of gender relationships been spoken about in such an empowering way.

  • Ariana Ray July 29, 2017   Reply →

    Bringing love to every interaction reflects to the world there is something else aside from violence, anger and brutality. It’s our choice to make that reflection available in the world or not.

  • Natalie Hawthorne July 29, 2017   Reply →

    Now thats what I call a reality check! To ask where did we go astray and what caused this is not something that we have been asking and why. The comforts of how we are living and what we have created we are so attached to, that we don’t want to expose and question them because we then get to see that we are fully responsible for the loveless ways we have created.

    • Otto Bathurst September 2, 2017   Reply →

      Yes. We are not even asking the question – let along trying to find the answer. In fact, I feel that the the answer is very simple if the question is asked with absolute intention to find the truth; open ourselves up and the answers are there. So, how bad does it have to get before humanity has the humility to ask this question?

  • Gill Randall July 29, 2017   Reply →

    This is a revelation for me to hear Serge Benhayon explaining about the human being the physical part and the being part being the energetic part of the body. I now understand how even with a serious pain or terminal illness, the human part can be this but the being part does not have to lose itself. Nowhere else has this been taught as such before, it exposes how education is so lacking in preparing us for how life really works. There is more on this subject in the next episode too, it is so great how each episode builds for the next one.

  • HM July 29, 2017   Reply →

    Serge Benhayon makes a great point about allowing people to be more of who they naturally are based on where they are at – so a woman who is caught up in what she looks like and is quite driven cannot go to the complete opposite overnight, but she can start to appreciate who she is underneath the drive and start from there.

    • Natallija August 2, 2017   Reply →

      Appreciating the comment you have shared here about ‘appreciating the women we are under the drive” is where I have been for a few weeks now and I must say the change is incredible. How amazing is it to view TV and be given a gift to heal an old way of living that keeps from being who we naturally are.

  • Samantha Davidson August 2, 2017   Reply →

    I am in a relationship and comprehending the games we play in our genders really does allow us and me to be more free of judgement, protection and expectations. I am here to express being a woman, my husband a man, but both are equal in this, there is nothing to be superior or inadequate about. There are many binds in society that lead us astray from true relationships, it is so important that interviews such as this are on the internet, they blow the lid on the illusions we have buried into our interactions.

  • Viktoria August 6, 2017   Reply →

    This war between the genders has been something that has been bugging me for a very long time. From a young age I always knew that boys are tender, and I never really understood what the term “boys will be boys” meant, until just now. This phrase always seemed like an insult to men so I was never interested in using it, and indeed it is. We are constantly doing/ saying things to keep ourselves in this illusion of ours.

  • Golnaz Shariatzadeh August 6, 2017   Reply →

    Oh it makes my heart melt hearing the unwavering love, tenderness and honouring with which Serge Benhayon speaks. I consider myself very loving and caring of people, yet I have a long way to go until I am able to hold people with so much grace and understanding regardless of what their behaviour and choices. He is a true role model for fundamentally and unconditionally loving people.

  • Rowena Stewart August 9, 2017   Reply →

    The depth of observation and understanding here is enormous. Serge Benhayon teaches us how, by taking some enormous steps back from every situation, we get to see a root cause and therein perceive another way forward. So far we have attempted to establish gender equality by ‘fighting for our rights’, yet the very essence of this takes us further away from our innate tenderness that lies within both men and women. The more we appreciate our true tenderness, the more we naturally grow together, re-discover our natural expression in this inherent partnership between men and women. Equality is not about doing the same things, it is about expressing from the same energy.

  • Ariana Ray August 10, 2017   Reply →

    What is clear is that while we have been comfortable with our lives, we have allowed the relationship between men and women to have been eroded and manipulated so much that we are living the polar opposite to who we are. Thank you Serge Benhayon for exposing the truth of this.

  • Ariana Ray August 14, 2017   Reply →

    The slightest part of ourselves that is not love seems to be the be the biggest magnifier ever. It lets in all manner of what we are not and the relationship between men and women is all too often built on a foundation of what is not love. Building love as our foundation is the only way forward out of this miasma that makes us into the opposite of who we are.

  • Stephen Gammack August 16, 2017   Reply →

    The tagline: “boys will be boys” its really actually not that subtle when it is laid bare here. And yet how many phrases and mannerisms do we associate with boys and men that keeps us stuck in a false picture of who we men are, which is gentle, tender and dare I say it naturally feminine in so many ways.

    • Lucy Dahill September 11, 2017   Reply →

      So true Stephen, there is such a cap put on men being tender and gentle yet the outplay of that is potentially men who don’t allow themselves to feel that tenderness as a positive and therefore fight it when it starts to come into their lives.

  • Ariana Ray August 21, 2017   Reply →

    ‘Boys are born with a natural tenderness and fragility, so what is being fostered in our society that would render men capable of domestic violence many years later?’ This is a great question and one which needs to be asked everywhere, we need to be having conversations like this.

  • John O Connell August 26, 2017   Reply →

    ” We ( male and female ) are fragile by nature we are very tender ” this is so lovely and true . The more we supports what is true about people the more it will be lived .

  • Ariana Ray August 31, 2017   Reply →

    We are so invested in men and women being different, but what is exposed here in this episode is that actually we are all equally sensitive. This is revolutionary in terms of our understanding how we are together, and the current state of play with each other highlights the outcome of our initial investment in difference.

  • Mary September 1, 2017   Reply →

    I can look back to when I was raising my daughter it was very noticeable that the young boys of her age were not allowed to cry if they hurt themselves and even at five there seemed to be huge pressure them to do well, compete against each other and excel at school. And this pressure was often coming from their fathers interestingly enough, so is it something that gets passed down from generation to generation and if this is the case perhaps it’s time to draw a line across this behaviour and say enough is enough, and start treating young boys and girls as the beautiful children they are.

  • Otto Bathurst September 2, 2017   Reply →

    Exquisite television brought to us by an exquisite man and an exquisite woman. Absolute living proof of the power of the combination of man and woman living in their true expressions.

  • Gill Randall September 2, 2017   Reply →

    Babies are all sensitive, male and female, and I have witnessed how small boys are naturally tender. As Rebecca Asquith says, men have become so entrapped. They need to be able to express that violence by men is not normal. Sensitivity in men is a beauty for us all to feel.

  • Tricia Nicholson September 4, 2017   Reply →

    A beautiful expression on tv of true harmony between men and women and the livingness of all that is said that can be felt and is known as truth . What a difference to most tv broadcast and how refreshing and real this is to hear, it offers so much to us all in society to take heed from. Expression of who we really are and the absoluteness of this for both men and women and our appreciative interactions together confirming our sensitivity, tenderness and love.

  • HM September 6, 2017   Reply →

    Wow – how powerful is the quote ‘the world will be saved by the western woman’ – this really sums up where we are as a society and how much opportunity there is for women to work together. There is way too much separation that keeps us from living our potential.

  • fiona lotherington September 7, 2017   Reply →

    It was so refreshing to hear men and women being discussed without any us and them. This interview shows the depth to which we need to go in order to turn around the problems we are experiencing in our relationships with ourselves as men and women and between the sexes. We need to step back a long way and question everything we think we currently know, not just a few steps to be able to see clearly.

  • Rachel Murtagh September 10, 2017   Reply →

    How beautiful is it to confirm that men and women are the same and equal in their tenderness? We spend so much of our lives putting on a front, trying to toughen up, putting on an act to hide the fact that we are indeed sensitive beings. What if both sexes honoured their sensitivity and lived it so… how much of life would change?

  • jennym September 10, 2017   Reply →

    It was so supportive to feel the healing that is available when we are not fighting or competing against each other as women and between the genders.

  • Lucy Dahill September 11, 2017   Reply →

    I love that there is no bashing in this interview, it is a discussion about how we can all appreciate each other more. There is a surrendering offered to the body when we stop trying to justify our gender and simply live from the essence of who we are. Now that is well worth dating!

  • Christoph Schnelle September 11, 2017   Reply →

    I find it interesting how quickly the tenderness can disappear from boys’ behaviour. At age 2 they may be very tender but at age three they may already be quite different. This is very early.

  • Golnaz Shariatzadeh September 12, 2017   Reply →

    It is refreshing to witness someone call out the abuse and atrocities for what they are, as not acceptable in any shape or form, yet also hold all parties in absolute love, understanding and regard.
    On top of that, here Serge Benhayon is offering expanded insights into the state of play between men and women that is deeply honouring of us All.

  • Stephen Gammack September 12, 2017   Reply →

    Both genders are equally worse off- this feels true, we can compare the genders as much as we like and call out the behaviours of both sexes, but things will only change if we accept that much needs to change about how we all relate and the values we place on ourselves. “We are (all) fragile by nature” what a great starting point to make such a change.

  • Rowena Stewart September 14, 2017   Reply →

    Whatever well worn topic is placed in front of Serge Benhayon, he never fails to ignite it with a new perspective and true purpose. When we make life about coming back to our innate tenderness, sweetness and powerful fragility regardless of our gender, we establish the true footings for successful relationship with both genders. Wise words in a world that continues to pitch gender against gender, words that uphold and empower our collective values.

  • John O Connell September 14, 2017   Reply →

    This is so wonderful to listen to, the clarity of how to examine a situation in that the end result is not the problem. Its important to not go into reaction of the end result, problem, but to go back how ever many steps to realise the source of the end result which is called a ” problem “. Just lovely.

  • Stephen Gammack September 15, 2017   Reply →

    There needs to be a much deeper conversation about gender equality. What we are fostering is a false equality, particularly in the Western Societies as talked about here. An equality that asks women to give up their natural nurturing qualities is not a real equality but is actually harming us all. Men need the reflection of women deeply caring for themselves, and women can be leaders without replicating errant male ways, and yet this is such an emotive subject and difficult to write about with out it seeming like a restriction on the emancipation of women. If we are meant to be fragile and precious then it should make us question all the leadership and successes we have to date celebrated in men and women and consider if this is what we want to continue chasing and accepting as normal.

    • Golnaz Shariatzadeh September 20, 2017   Reply →

      It is true that often when it is mentioned that women do not need to take on the hardness and the bullish driven characteristic currently shown by many men, many take issue with it as ‘restriction on the emancipation of women’. Yet what if these characteristics are not even natural for men? Then what?
      The clarity Serge Benhayon shines on the many predicaments we are facing offers a much needed space for reflection and re-assessment of our ideals and beliefs.

  • Gill Randall September 21, 2017   Reply →

    We are so blessed to have here episodes that expose the misconceptions of the behaviour of men and women. Men and women are not horrid, ruthless or aggressive by nature but that is how we are behaving at the moment is the ‘reality that we have made real’. The results of this reality of illness and disease proves we are miles away from who we truly are.

  • Michael Brown September 24, 2017   Reply →

    What if in previous lives we were a different gender? Would that make us consider how we treat members of the opposite sex?

  • Natalie Hawthorne September 25, 2017   Reply →

    The fragility that both genders have is something that in the past i would have considered weak, pathetic and annoying. But today this is completely turned around as I have started to let go of the protection that I had created that was propped up by all this hardness and toughness. I thought I needed to be that way so I was cool, liked and also because I didn’t want to be hassled – so if I put off a tough persona then I was less likely to be hassled. There is so much beauty in allowing ourselves to be fragile, tender and precious not just for ourselves or the selected few but for all, and show that this is indeed our natural way of being.

  • Golnaz Shariatzadeh September 27, 2017   Reply →

    When reflecting on and discussing the issues between men and women, it is common for there to be anger, blame, opposition and animosity.
    In this episode we have a wonderful example in Serge Benhayon and Rebecca Asquith of how any issue, however contentious, can be observed, examined and discussed with the greatest level of love, care, honouring and consideration for all parties.

  • Ariana Ray September 28, 2017   Reply →

    In this interview ‘Serge Benhayon and Rebecca Asquith explore the state of play between men and women and the essence of what a true expression of gender could look like, beyond the manufactured male/female ideals we are conditioned by.’ They go underneath all the pretence and lies that the media presents us as and expose what is really our game. Excellent TV.

  • Richard Mills September 29, 2017   Reply →

    What an immense responsibility we all have to choose to live life from the true and innate beingness from which we originate. We have made life what it is and we must make different choices if we truly want it to change. But it is not an onerous task we face, but in truth a joyful one.

  • Natalie Hawthorne September 30, 2017   Reply →

    This is something that we can’t deny – and that is the responsibility in our parenting skills and Education system and how this is key. The way we teach, share and integrate our way of living in connection with our Soul/Being and not to disconnect from this in and throughout life.

  • Natalie Hawthorne October 3, 2017   Reply →

    Its our responsibility to educate and bring up our young to bring their full beingness to all that they do. This comes back to our relationship with ourselves and what best to teach, share and educate but to come from a lived expression of someone that is making those choices also. Leading by example and being role models is exactly what is needed so when we do encourage our young to do the same at least they are getting a reflection that this true.

  • Rachel Murtagh October 4, 2017   Reply →

    So much understanding is brought to the table… and with understanding, there is no battle of the sexes. We find there is a beauty in the expression of men as men and women as women and underneath is all a commonality of sensitivity.

  • Natalie Hawthorne October 6, 2017   Reply →

    This masculine energy that Women in the west have turned to is something that I have known very well. From such a young age I could feel the competition with men and override and pushing to keep up or out do them. Now in my early 40’s and thanks to Serge Benhayon and the teachings of the Ageless Wisdom I have been able to connect much deeper than this, feel the innate stillness within and feel how sweet, delicate and precious it really is. That this is what I had been seeking my whole life I just didn’t know how to connect to it. 2014 was a year where I knew my life was about to change and I had been waiting for it my whole life. Huge appreciation for Serge Benhayon and the Benhayon family for consistently showing to me that we are indeed much more than the physical form and that as a Woman I hold something very precious and sacred within me that is there for all to see and feel.

  • Natalie Hawthorne October 8, 2017   Reply →

    Recently I was discussing that endometriosis is starting to be come a common condition for women. This is huge in the fact that it is being casually talked about as if it is normal to have this condition. Every movement and action has an impact on our bodies, if they are not harmonious then we need to look at the way we are moving and living that is not supporting this.

  • Ariana Ray October 12, 2017   Reply →

    ‘Boys are born with a natural tenderness and fragility’ and to nurture that is how we need to be raising our children. It’s time to change how we have always done things, for the state of the world is telling us it has not worked.

  • Shami October 14, 2017   Reply →

    This part about ‘liking tough guys’ is very exposing, because it shows to me a deeper unrest that is happening in women’s lives that many of us are perhaps yet to be aware of. But this is what I love about Serge Benhayon, when he presents this kind of thing that just makes me stop and look more closely or differently at what there is to consider.

  • Michael Brown October 16, 2017   Reply →

    I saw a video where young boys were asked to slap a girl, and they all beautifully refused. When asked why, they gave the most tender and sweet looks and answers into the camera. The question then being – Where does this natural way of being disappear to to the point of violence we have currently?

  • Alison Valentine October 18, 2017   Reply →

    Taking 100 steps back makes sense, when we do we can then see that boys are not born a brute, they are naturally tender gentle and loving, so it has to be something we impose on them that forces them into the ideals and beliefs that we demand they should have. We need to change the way we speak to boys, such as ‘man up’, ‘boys will be boys’, ‘don’t be a wuss’, which can be deeply hurtful when a young boy wants to honour his natural beauty and fragility, words that are not usually associated with young boys.

  • Jennifer Smith October 29, 2017   Reply →

    I was working on a hospital ward one day and saw one of our patients, who was a very big man walking down the corridor, carrying his very tiny 6 month old baby. I found myself having to stop and watch. What I realised at that point is that when men (and women too) are with babies we are as we are naturally meant to be. Very tender and sensitive. Not only are we born this way as babies and then children, babies and children inspire us to return to this very natural state also.

  • Sarah Karam October 31, 2017   Reply →

    One of the things that stood out in this interview was that raising a child to be who they are is about showering them with love, that is not necessarily aimed at the fact that they are a boy or a girl but more at the essence of the quality they are, this is such a beautiful way for us to bring forth our next generation. The gap we have made between men and woman starts with the culture of how we rise our children, if we make our love for them about the essence of who they are and not what society expects them to be, we already turning the tide.

  • Jennifer Smith November 2, 2017   Reply →

    Is what we call normal…normal? This is very important to ponder further on. We have had clear downward spirals in relationships, health, lifestyle choices etc and have not questioned this. We have simply re calibrated our normal.

  • Gill Randall November 5, 2017   Reply →

    It feels really sad that we live with the behaviour of domestic violence, when we all, girls and boys are born so naturally tender as Serge Benhayon describes, and we are living so far away from this. Serge Benhayon gives us such tools like going 100 steps back to our beginning to know that violence is impossible even if our reality is that these behaviours exist. We need to teach the beauty of our tenderness by our reflection to the next generation so they have the permission to allow themselves to hold their tenderness too.

  • Ariana Ray November 6, 2017   Reply →

    The state of play between men and women seems to be getting more and more intense every day, all the more reason why we need TV programmes by Serge Benhayon who expose the reason behind what is going on.

  • Gill Randall November 7, 2017   Reply →

    Serge Benhayon talks here about us qualifying our natural being, developing our own qualities of being naturally beautiful, tender and gorgeous, and to encourage and live that. I can feel how it develops to bring a knowing that we are all from that same quality, no matter how we behave, then we can all be able to relate to each other for the knowing of who we all truly are. This is amazing TV .

  • Samantha Davidson November 11, 2017   Reply →

    As a humanity we are seriously sick when we can not live in harmony, we survive but we do not flourish, we see each other more as the enemy than our true compliment. We are all responsible for how we are with each other, there are no victims here. We all, women and men have a natural expression with can work in harmony with one another, do we allow it to be lived and expressed…I would say for the majority no…Serge Benhayon, may confront some, but if you listen to the words with an open heart you will hear and feel love to a depth that is rarely if ever encountered in humanity.

  • Rebecca November 12, 2017   Reply →

    I love how Serge takes on these issues that the world faces with a calmness and assureity – when we consider life from the perspective of energy first, it makes sense of so many seemingly senseless things.

  • Golnaz Shariatzadeh November 19, 2017   Reply →

    Such a great hallmark of Ageless Wisdom. Instead of focusing on the unloving choices and bahviour of a person, to start by the awareness that every single one of us are deeply sensitive, aware, loving and multidimentional beings. The next natural question becomes what led such a being to behave in opposition to the truth of their expression? And here we start seeing the most profound revelations that fundamentally honour and consider every single person involved.

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